Tags: history - usa protest & war movements

* - galaxy

The Bonners Ferry Loophole - (wikiwiki)

Bonners Ferry* is a city in and the county seat of Boundary County, Idaho, United States.[4] The population was 2,543 at the 2010 census.

Before the gold rush, only a few visitors had come to the region; one of the first was explorer David Thompson, a cartographer for the North West Company. Thompson and four fellow fur traders arrived in 1808 to trade with the Lower Kootenais. The local natives gave Thompson's party dried fish and moss bread. Thompson returned the next year and established a trading post on Lake Pend Oreille. He was followed in 1846 by Jesuit Priest Father DeSmet, a missionary to the Kootenai Tribe.[6]

On September 20, 1974, the Kootenai Tribe, headed by chairwoman Amy Trice, declared war on the United States government. Their first act was to post soldiers on each end of the highway that runs through the town and they asked people, to pay a toll to drive through what had been the tribe's aboriginal land. The money would be used to house and care for elderly tribal members. Most tribes in the United States are forbidden to declare war on the U.S. government because of treaties, but the Kootenai Tribe never signed a treaty. The dispute resulted in the concession by the United States government and a land grant of 10.5 acres (42,000 m2) that is now the Kootenai Reservation.[10]

Bonners Ferry is 8 miles (13 km) from the site of the Ruby Ridge confrontation and siege in 1992, which occurred just outside Naples, Idaho.

In recent years, Mormon Fundamentalists from nearby Bountiful, British Columbia have established a presence in Bonners Ferry. They have brought with them the controversial practice of plural marriage.[11]


*Not to be confused with Fairy's Boner.
cheers - applause

Talkin' 'bout a Revolution - Tracy Chapman

I think this song is worth keeping alive...

"Internationally, this single was a big hit, reaching the Top 40 in several countries, including France and New Zealand, becoming a classic in Chapman's song repertoire.[2] The song received heavy radio play in Tunisia in 2011 during the Tunisian Revolution.[3][4] The song has also been used as an unofficial theme for Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders' 2016 presidential campaign. This song played before speeches at campaign rallies.[5]"

Note - It is interesting that both the Arab Spring and the Bernie Sanders fling were influenced by this song. The Madison protests (2011) and the Arab Spring (2011) both fed back into each other, and from that energy eventually came OCCUPY, in the USA, (etc.) Then came BLM and Sanders, neither of which could have gained strength without this question-authority momentum which preceded them.

However, the Arab Spring was seeded by American interests, along long-term strategies of USSR Containment, and the NeoCon/GOP "PNAC" - the Project for a New American Century. It was also facilitated by the CIA, Google, FaceBook and Twitter. Of course, destabilising 7 Arab countries did NOT lead to the hoped-for, and promised, democratisation. Only Tunisia was a success, in this regard. And, Egypt did manage to throw out both Mubarek AND the Muslim Brotherhood, who was backed by this Western strategy of destabilisation, and inserting puppet strong-man regimes. It is also said that Barack Obama had personal connections to the Muslim Brotherhood, but this is not widely acknowledged.

Apparently, the Tracy Chapman song might have been meant to be less of a protest song as a poke in the eye of people who merely TALK about change, but don't really instigate or get involved. Such has been the bane of American history, ever since 1/3 of Americans chose to sit out the American Revolution, (while another 1/3 supported England). This comfortable numbness is easy to adopt, in a culture of people who feel detached from government, yet are daily fed with delightful TV, junk food, political lies, infinite games of internet, and now, adept social programming via propaganda from the Deep Insecurity State.

Similarly, and regarding political lies, in most every (lucrative) war, it has taken some contrived event to shake people out of their complacency, and into demanding a fight. That includes 9/11. This social tardive dyskenesia could be seen as a good thing - or a bad thing. I'll leave that discussion for some other time.

But, when the time comes to move, people will latch on to the music and the marches that seem to fit the movement. Sometimes, the choices are absurdly odd or ironic, but they don't care. And so, whatever the true meaning of Tracy Chapman's song, it was used as a potent tool in movements which were both sincere and also funded by covert agents, such as the CIA, or George Soros. Of course, I prefer to see it as a song of protest. And that's all I have to say for now - I am done talkin' 'bout it, it, it, it.

Wiki - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talkin%27_%27bout_a_Revolution

Lyrics - http://songmeanings.com/songs/view/3530822107858554163/

YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKYWOwWAguk

(See tag for other protest songs).