where hypotheses come to die (madman101) wrote,
where hypotheses come to die
madman101

Say something I'm throwing up on you

Thought for today: I realised that all of my LJ friends, excluding wanderipity, are trolls.  TROLLS!  remember when being a troll was bad?  Now you too are bad.  Bad like a troll!

Further thoughts: The song, "Say something, I'm giving up on you," is somewhat fashioned after Adele's, "Hello."  Some songs do that: They deliberately imitate popular songs - in key, or beat, or lyric/phrasing, etc. - so they can be popular, too.  They hope that DJ's will play their songs right after the original songs, because they fit so well together.  Or, a lot of times, the similarity is just a coincidence, a la, George Harrison's, "My Sweet Lord."

The newer song, "Stay with me", is a gospel-fashioned derivative of Tom Petty's, "Won't Back Down."

Today, there are trends gone rampant, with songs where the singer breaks words into additional, separate sylabbles, which seems to have started with Amy Winehouse.  Then there is the half-grunt, where the singer is expressing profound yet stupid emphasis, for example, saying "eyh", when they mean, "yes."  Then there is the guy immitating the Coldplay's guy's falsetto jumps, and related.  Oh, and the crazy trend I really like, is the disco chant, oo-ey, oo-ey!  Right?  That is everywhere, in some form or another.  I remember it first surfacing somewhere around 2000, or maybe 1990's.  But, I have found that it began earlier than that, in a1970's disco song I cannot remember for you right now, but it doesn't matter because you are a troll.

Here's a flash of insight: The song, "I'm A Single Lady", by Beyonce, really sounds like it is a jump-rope song.  Am I right.  Of course I'm right because I am just like Jodi Foster.

Adele's song, "We Could Have had It All," has a Native American beat to it - you know - "boil that dust-speck!"  Like a reggae beat, (see Jonas brothers "Only Human"), the Indian Drum beat is used every once in a while for variety.  It became prominent around 1970, or whenever it was that Marvin Gaye put out, "Heard It Through The Grapevine."  For a few years after that, a lot of black music incorporated that beat into soul and funk, and it helped formed one root of disco..

Some more music trends: I am hearing at least a half dozen songs singing about alcohol or drinking.  That is very new - at least to this extent.  And there are about as many songs about being special nomatter what - being accepted for what I am - being beautiful in very possible way, apparently despite how you really look or act...

And, I believe, this message is part of a broad swath of songs inspiring younger people to, shall we say, rise up, a la Alecia Keyes.  There are a few lofty warrior calls or chants.  But, in contrast, there are a few 'traditional' pop songs that are really fun and delightfully substanceless, like, KP's "California Girl", etc.  Speaking of substance - substance is low, in recent songs.  Adele is really strong on (emotional) substance, but she hasn't put out new stuff.  Coldplay was substance, but now their most substantial song is, "The Chainsmoker."  The majority of songs are vox-corder, computer-processed silliness.

Final observation: Jodi Foster was asked to star in the movie, "Double Jeopardy," which ended being lead by Ashley Judd.  Jodi Foster originated from this area, which is why she talks this way...

After Michelle Pfeiffer, Meg Ryan and Brooke Shields all declined the role, Jodie Foster was attached to star in the film as Libby Parsons and Bruce Beresford met with her several times about the script:

She said to me once, when we were having . . .not an argument, we had different points of view over something, and she said, 'We'll have to do it my way, I'm afraid.' And I said, 'Why, Jodie?' And she said, 'Because I'm so intelligent. I'm such an intelligent person that there is no point in disagreeing with me because I'm always right.' I thought she was joking, but she wasn't! [laughs] She had this extraordinary opinion of her own IQ.[2]


AND:

She later stated that going to college was "a wonderful time of self-discovery", and changed her thoughts about acting, which she had previously thought was an unintelligent profession, but now realised that "what I really wanted to do was to act and there was nothing stupid about it."[28][63]

Jodi Foster is always right - because she is Jodi Foster. WE CAN'T ALL SAY THAT CAN WE?

If you want to find more music linked in this post, come back to it later, and by then I may have linked to videae.
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