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avril 2019   01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
One of my more important topics here is the secret life of plants: How plants communicate with each other; how plants have plant-like feelings; how plants respond to music, the sun, compassion, etc. I use them as an example of how, 1 - we humans have a deeper consciousness or spirituality, which is comparable to that of plants, animals, fungi - even bacteria, and, 2 - the rest of our environment, including microorganisms and even chemicals and minerals and electricity, may also carry a consciousness which may extend everywhere, from inside of distant stars to inside our bones. And this means that, as in the 'mechanics' of plants, everything around us and within us share a dynamism of thought and so on. If you understand my paradoxical philosophy, then you know that I hold that opposite realities are also compatible - but that is too complex to get into here.

The main point is that plants - a kind of chemical machinery - also have a beingness, or spirit, and they exist - they LIVE. I have always believed this, but one idea which helped develop these ideas was the discovery that microrhyzal fungi, which are devastated by Glyphosate/RoundUp, btw, are essential to the roots and the life of plants. These fibrous fungi grow and extend between plants, and help plants share and ration their resources. It was soon found that plants communicate via these fungi - beings apart from the plants themselves. In fact, trees use their vast roots and these even vaster fungi to communicate across wide forest areas, determining how each other lives, and who should live or die. If one tree senses fire, or an approaching herbivore, or loggers, it will tell the entire forest in this way. The trees cannot get up and run away, but they do have ways of hunkering down or surviving.

I learnt a lot about gardening, plants, wildlife, via Wisconsin Public Radio, WPR, in Madison. Larry Mealher, Joan Whats-her-name, etc. One guy, who has been around forever, has the same last name as one of my friends of the past, "Gilliland." My friend insisted that the name is pronounced, "Gilland," but the guy on the radio always prounounces it as it is written. The only reason I am mentioning this guy's name is because my old friend was a good LJ friend, too, and I am letting you ponder, out there, just who she was. Anyway, Norman Gilliland reads a chapter a day, over the radio, of deserving books. This week and next week, the book is: "The Hidden Life of Trees."

This is a nice book to listen to. You can hear chapters via the website/s. BUT - one problem is that, due to copyright arrangements, each chapter disappears from the site after one week. That means that you should check it out ASAP, as it rapidly disappears, back into the forest floor. Or, you could even buy the book...

SEE THESE:
https://www.wpr.org/programs/archives/chapter-a-day
https://www.wpr.org/programs/chapter-day
https://www.wpr.org/shows/hidden-life-trees-1-15

Quoth:

Trees care for their sick and dying, nurture one another and alert each other to threats. By doing so, they create unique ecosystems which help all of the trees to live longer, better lives. Norman Gilliland reads from "The Hidden Life of Trees" by Peter Wohlleben and Jane Billinghurst.

Much like human families, tree parents live together with their children, communicate with them, and support them as they grow, sharing nutrients with those who are sick or struggling and creating an ecosystem that mitigates the impact of extremes of heat and cold for the whole group. Drawing on groundbreaking new discoveries, Wohlleben presents the science behind the secret and previously unknown life of trees and their communication abilities.


One Xmas, I made and sent out cards along the theme of "Tree." Drawings of trees. Poems. Because, trees are a little more interesting than your standard 2000 year-old crucifix. And to me, tress are spiritual in a far more living sense. My father once culled trees in the Tasmanian forest, and he passed down not this trauma, but this love, to me epigenetically. But those who received my cards rather just dismissed me as crazy, and, as usual, never respected me enough to even respond. Rather, they ultimately took away my garden and my gardening and my tree-culling and tree-planting, which were all the greatest therapies my health could have been given. And for this reason, among many, I have learnt to really distrust anyone who claims authority and control in the name of religion - in this neck of the woods, specifically, Christianity. But, it could be any of a number of other mundane insanities.

See also: KEYWORDS

Comments:


erinfondue
erinfondue at 2019-04-05 19:16 (UTC) (Lien)
Thank you for the book recommendation.
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