?

Log in

No account? Create an account
juillet 2019   01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
* - galaxy

The Science of Woops

Posted on 2019.03.28 at 16:49
Tags: , , , ,

Arthur W. Galston (April 21, 1920 – June 15, 2008) was an American botanist and bioethicist. As a plant biologist, Galston studied the effects of light on plant development. He identified riboflavin and other flavins as photoreceptors involved in phototropism, the bending of plants toward light, challenging the prevailing view that carotene was responsible.[1]

The University of Illinois offered Galston a teaching assistantship for graduate work, so he went to Champaign-Urbana to study botany and biochemistry.  Galston's Ph.D. dissertation was titled Physiology of flowering, with especial reference to floral initiation in soybeans (1943).[7] His research focused on finding a chemical means to make soybeans flower and fruit earlier, so that they could mature before the end of the growing season.[8] He discovered both that 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) would speed up the flowering of soybeans. He also noted that in higher concentrations it would defoliate the soybeans[8] by causing them to release ethylene.[6]

This lovely discovery was soon metamorphosed into the wartime defoliant, Agent Orange, which caused widespread injury, death and environmental destruction, which continue today.  Dioxins remain in the soil of Vietnam, etc.  Agent Orange was just one of the many products brought to you by Monsanto-now-Bayer, including PCBs, Glyphosate, RoundUp-Ready GMO soybeans, etc....

"I used to think that one could avoid involvement in the antisocial consequences of science simply by not working on any project that might be turned to evil or destructive ends. I have learned that things are not all that simple, and that almost any scientific finding can be perverted or twisted under appropriate societal pressures. In my view, the only recourse for a scientist concerned about the social consequences of his work is to remain involved with it to the end. His responsibility to society does not cease with publication of a definitive scientific paper. Rather, if his discovery is translated into some impact on the world outside the laboratory, he will, in most instances, want to follow through to see that it is used for constructive rather than anti-human purposes.... Science is now too potent in transforming our world to permit random fallout of the social consequences of scientific discoveries. Some scrutiny and regulation are required, and I believe that scientists must play an important role in any bodies devised to carry out such tasks."[18]

That's what he said.  See also Einstein.

Previous Entry  Next Entry