where hypotheses come to die (madman101) wrote,
where hypotheses come to die
madman101

No, I Can't

Brain/fatigue etc. continues. Only today has my neocortex been awakened to realise that all those dishes piled up in the kitchen should, and actually could, be washed. When I get the energy. Hard to plan, fathom, empathize when I am in this condition. Out of bed yet incapable. But today I finally managed to go see a movie, buying wine first. My first wine in about a half a year.

Saw "Can You Ever Forgive Me?" - I went looking for a classy indie film but it slid too close to being just another sensationaliser, letting the morally decrepit masses think that lying and forgery and selling drugs and being spiteful etc. are all normal funny things. Just another brick in the head. Today's America seems too far gone, gobbling up seedy decadence like pathetic sleeze puppies.

I didn't hate this movie - it was acted well, and there were a few subtle side-embellishments that I delighted in, and which the paltry audience generally missed. And, even though I am tired of so many movies being about writers, I could relate to this woman - or bits of my past could. I have been in tortuous situations where one is just strangled by the oppression of fear, or guilt, or loneliness, etc. The problem I had was that this woman never really changed. Even while supposedly making retribution, she reveals her same old spite and deception and cheating. And, she revealed to the judge that her greatest problem was not guilt but fear of being caught. That is pretty low-grade on the Maslow curve, and it saddens that some peopel in the audience just laughed this off joyfully.

This was an OK movie to add to your collection of movies-seen, like so many movies today, but it was not the greatest. Sure, it is fine to commiserate with plain-looking people in dire straights, or trapped by their own misanthropy/autism/pride, as they heroically stick it to the man. But hasn't that hippie rebelliousness kinda worn thin by now? Not a movie for millennials. This movie has as much moral fibre as "Three Billboards" which the Hollywood crowd all loved. It was worth seeing, but I left near the end, seeing there was no hope in it. The British actor, Richard E. Grant, was very good. But there was a little too much over-acting, mostly by Melissa McCarthy, as if there were signs pointing to their heads, saying, e.g., "Look, now I am showing REMORSE here, see?" Catering to the less deft and the more daft.

A review said that only someone like Melissa McCarthy could have pulled this off w/o the audience despising the main character. (I'm kinda tired of hearing that line, regarding movies, btw). I don't think I've ever seen Melissa McCarthy before, so this is a fresh view: I didn't rely on her acting, I relied on the story, and I came out with thumbs down on Lee Israel. So, what became of the main character's, Lee Israel's, redemption? She made a book out of her crimes, which became a movie, which made her lots of money. SAME FUCKING DIFFERENCE, morally speaking.

Transitioning from brain pain to buzzed now, and never the twain shall meet but in fury. On my walk home tonight, a police car not only slowed aside me on my walk, but went into a parking lot I began crossing, as if I was some kind of problem. I tell you. I get crap on the internet. I get crap from idiots attacking me in real life. I get this. Where can I go to simple walk alone like I am not some kind of radicalised Antifa NAZI?

Look, Mommy, he's a MILITANT ATHEIST!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

No, I'm sorry, but I can't.

Speaking of forgeries.

That's all most people are.

Thieves of the spirit.
Tags: -posted to moviebuffs, movies - 'can you ever forgive me?'
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