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le 16 octobre 2018



https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/10/181012092949.htm

Early changes to synapse gene regulation may cause Alzheimer's disease

New research has revealed a role for splicing proteins in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased phosphorylation of the SRRM2 protein, seen in AD mouse models and human patients, was found to block its transport to the nucleus. This reduced levels of the PQBP1 protein, causing abnormal changes to the splicing of synapse genes and cognitive decline. These phenotypes were reversed by restoring PQBP1 function, suggesting a possible future treatment for AD.

Developing Teens Need Sleep to Thwart Alzheimer’s Risk – Study
Researchers warn sleep directly impacts risk for disease

Teenagers with erratic sleep patterns may have a higher risk of Alzheimer’s than their well-rested peers, new tests on mice suggest.

Children up to 18 years old are advised to get a solid eight hours of sleep a night, but the hormonal spikes of puberty – and taste for rebellion – make that tough.

However, a new study by neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania found teens who cut down on sleep, or wake up during the night, are more likely to develop dangerous build-ups in their brain that pave the way to dementia.

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Let's protect the oceans like national parks

Posted on 2018.10.16 at 15:36
Ted Talk: Let's protect the oceans like national parks | David Lang

You don't have to be a scientist to help protect the world's oceans, says underwater drone expert and TED Fellow David Lang -- in fact, ordinary citizens have pulled together to save the planet's natural treasures many times in history. Lang asks us to take a lesson from the story of the US National Parks Service, offering a three-point plan for conserving underwater wonders.

'There is hope here': Fukushima turns to tourism after nuclear meltdown

The region may forever be associated with catastrophe, but some residents want the world to know that life goes on

Even now, almost eight years after a deadly earthquake and tsunami triggered a meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the disaster’s physical legacy is impossible to avoid.

The shells of gutted homes stand in barren rice paddies that lay in the path of waves that killed more than 18,000 people across three prefectures in north-east Japan – including 1,600 in Fukushima – on the afternoon of 11 March 2011.

Continue reading...


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The science of sustainability

Posted on 2018.10.16 at 19:04
Tags:
The science of sustainability

Can humans drive economic growth, meet rising demand for food, energy and water, and make significant environmental progress? The short answer is 'yes,' but it comes with several big 'ifs.' New research shows that we can put the world on a path to sustainability if we make significant changes within the next 10 years.

Modifiable dementia risk factor in older adults identified

Stiffness of the aorta -- more so than blood pressure or subclinical brain disease -- is a key risk factor for dementia. Since aortic stiffness can be reduced by medication and healthy lifestyle changes, these results suggest that people can still lower their dementia risk well into old age.

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is doing

Posted on 2018.10.16 at 20:59
There is no fall

Without trees

Please.

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